Ten Years of Jakaya Kikwete Presidency

Ten Years of Jakaya Kikwete Presidency

President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete (65) is the fourth President of the United Republic of Tanzania who served for ten years between 2005 and 2015. A graduate of economics from the University of Dar es Salaam in 1975, Kikwete has spent his career mostly in politics serving at various capacities both in TANU (Tanganyika African Union) and CCM (Chama cha Mapinduzi-Party for Revolution) parties before working for the central government from 1988 (Nyang’oro, 2011). He became the youngest minister for Finance in 1994 and served as the longest Minister for Foreign Affairs during the entire period of Benjamin Mkapa’s presidency from 1995 to 2005. Kikwete was elected President of the United Republic of Tanzania on 14th December 2005, and he effectively retired on 5th November 2015.

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